On the theme of Ryde

I have been working on my Ryde themed pieces for the September TRAC exhibtition and as you will see, I’ve decided to work in the abstract rather than to try and reinterpret popular landmarks.  There has been a lot in the news about the impact of   ‘Ghost gear’ from the fishing industry and a stroll along Ryde Sands revealed that even the beautiful beaches here are not free from such detritus. The pieces of ‘beach string’ seem to be shorter here than what is often found on Cornish beaches, for example, but still just as harmful to marine life. How could I incorporate them into my work?

I collected some multicoloured string and a couple of pieces of driftwood for good measure. After some trial and error, I decided that I would deconstruct the string and work on some small woven pieces. I found my trusty Spear’s weaving loom, a childhood toy that was rarely used, was perfect for working in this way. Tune in next time to see how I turned this into a piece of work:

 

 

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Textile Tales

Stitch StoryI enjoyed the most inspirational day I’ve had in ages yesterday. Local artist Rebecca Robinson ran her first workshop, Textile Tales, in her new studio at the Depozitory in Ryde. I knew I would be challenged because she had marketed it around the idea of memories and stitch; I live very much in the present and find the idea of memories difficult. I also don’t really work with photographs or vintage materials. However, by the end of the 4 hours I was hooked. I had learnt several new ways of reproducing images that could be incorporated into my work and had really loosened up the creative urge. So much so that, as you can see, I’m blogging again! The image you can see, left, is the unrolling of the work this morning. I’ve pieced things together ready to stitch.

Yesterday evening was spent perusing Cas Holmes’ Stitch Stories and The Found Object I wanted to know more about this technique. The dog had an extra special walk through the fields today as I gathered a few plant samples for monoprinting. I feel the need to incorporate something more of my own into the composition. What fun – here is a selection of the 20 or so monoprints I made this morning. Image 1, left, is the result of the plate, an old OHP sheet, inked up with the plant laid on top. A piece of paper was laid over both and rubbed firmly. Image 2, the plant is peeled off the plate and placed on the fabric. A clean OHP sheet was laid on top and was rubbed over firmly and the plant was peeled off. Image 3, is the result of a piece of cloth laid over the plate after the plant has been peeled off. 3 very different prints from one hard working plant.